Sunday, July 14

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Who knew? There’s actually a right way (and a wrong way) to pet a dog

Veterinarians stress that there’s etiquette you should follow when petting a dog. This is especially true if it’s a dog you don’t know. Much like humans, dogs are complex creatures with a wide range of personalities, so it helps to know the basics of dog psychology and body language before approaching. The best way to initiate contact with a dog (after getting the owner’s permission, of course) is to reach out and let the dog sniff your hand. Dogs live through their olfactory sense much more than their visual one, so be sure to keep your hands curled, as if you were chopping vegetables, just in case the dog feels threatened and lunges to bite your fingers. If the dog seems pretty comfortable and doesn’t recoil from your hand, the best place to pet a dog is under the chin. The one thin...
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How Digital Pricing Works—And Might Save You Money (or might not!)

Digital price labels could be coming to a grocery store near you—if it isn’t there already. The pricing system, which replaces paper stickers with electronic labels that can be changed in real time, is being rolled out in stores like Whole Foods, Amazon Fresh, and the Midwestern chain Schnucks. Walmart recently became the latest retailer to announce that it will soon switch to a digital pricing model, expanding into 2,300 stores by 2026. But the switch has caused apprehension amongst consumers worried that the ability for stores to change prices quickly might make them more vulnerable to price gouging— in which the price of a good is increased when there’s higher demand. [More]
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How to Know When High Temperatures Are Getting Dangerous—And What to Do to Stay Safe in a Heat Wave

The Midwest and East Coast are in the middle of a heat dome, with temperatures exceeding 100 degrees. Heat waves are getting hotter as global warming leads to more extreme weather, and 2023 was the hottest year on record. Some scientists say 2024 is poised to be even hotter overall. As temperatures rise, so do concerns about heat-related illnesses. According to the National Weather Service, heat kills more people in the U.S. than hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes combined. Doctors are also still learning about how poor sleep quality on hot days can increase symptoms of anxiety and depression. Here's a brief guide to preventing heat exhaustion and heat stroke— and what cities around the U.S. are doing to help residents stay safe.